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Upon the death of Charles Jencks –

October 16, 2019

Charles Jencks, Cells of Life, Jupiter Artland (Photo: Allan Pollok-Morris, Courtesy of Jupiter Artland)

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Charles Jencks, Cells of Life, Jupiter Artland (Photo: Allan Pollok-Morris, Courtesy of Jupiter Artland)

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Charles Jencks, Cells of Life, Jupiter Artland (Photo: Allan Pollok-Morris, Courtesy of Jupiter Artland)

Charles Jencks, historian of influential architecture and landscape, died last Sunday in London, at the age of 80 years. In addition to her highly acclaimed books and landscaping, her commitment to the Maggie Centers and the fight against cancer will be remembered.

His interests were vast and his work varied – Charles Jencks worked as a cultural theorist, landscape architect and architectural historian. He also co-founded Maggie's cancer treatment centers.

But the many architects of Jenck are well known for his writings on postmodern architecture, including the book "The Language of Postmodern Architecture", first published in 1977 and updated several times since. It dates the death of modern architecture on July 15, 1972 at 3:32 pm (approximately) "during the explosion of the Pruitt-Igoe residential complex in St. Louis (Missouri). After writing the cult status, this book has written dozens of others, many of which have examined postmodernism and other developments in late 20th century architecture.

The famous evolutionary tree of twentieth century architecture by Charles Jencks

In 2003, Jencks created the RIBA Charles Jencks Award "to honor a person (or practice) who has recently made a significant contribution to the theory and practice of architecture." Operators include Alejandro Aravena (2018), Duke & de Meuron (2015) and Rem Koolhaas (2012). Anyone who will take Jenck's permanent position on the jury is always open.

Maggie & # 39; s Dundee (2003) was designed by Frank Gehry. Landscaping was the responsibility of Arabella Lennox-Boyd. (Photo © Maggie & # 39; s Centers)

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Maggie & # 39; s Dundee (2003) was designed by Frank Gehry. Landscaping was the responsibility of Arabella Lennox-Boyd. (Photo © Maggie & # 39; s Centers)

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Maggie & # 39; s Dundee (2003) was designed by Frank Gehry. Landscaping was the responsibility of Arabella Lennox-Boyd. (Photo © Maggie & # 39; s Centers)

In addition to his writings, Jencks has dealt with landscape architecture and has been able to implement a number of projects – not just in the UK. The parks and gardens designed by Jencks are characterized by curved and spiral terrain shapes that express its cosmological beliefs. His own garden in Scotland is probably the best known of these creations. Jencks has also been involved in the Maggie Centers, small structures where cancer patients have access to therapeutic support, which he founded with his future breast cancer survivor, Maggie Keswick. Like her husband, Keswick was a landscape architect (her most famous book was "The Chinese Garden" of 1978) and favored small, intimate buildings for the sick closely associated with the landscapes she had designed. The much-admired buildings were designed by Frank Gehry, Steven Holl and other world-renowned architects. The design of the environment always corresponded to the ideals of Keswick.

Jencks leaves a precious legacy with many books, landscape designs and Maggie centers. His death is a painful loss not only for the international architectural scene.

As one can read on the Maggie's website, Charles' London House will now be called "The Cosmic House" and will be visited as a museum.